17 November 2017 | General News

Prof Albert R Newsome, Raffles Professor of History at NUS in 2005 and Distinguished Professor of History and Director of the Global Research Institute at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill noted that a new generation bred on smartphones and social media is changing social mores. He discussed what the heavy reliance on electronic technology is doing to both our own moral development and to our ability to connect deeply with others around us.

The Straits Times

17 November 2017 | General News

Ms Yuriko Koike, Governor of Tokyo in Japan, gave a public lecture at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at NUS on 17 November 2017. Ms Koike was in Singapore as the 60th Lee Kuan Yew Exchange Fellow, under a programme that invites outstanding individuals for high level visits.

The Straits Times

17 November 2017 | General News, Research

Renowned crab expert Prof Peter Ng, Head of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum (LKCNHM) at NUS and Programme Director of Singapore’s Marine Science Research and Development Programme, commented on the behaviour of coconut crabs after a video of a coconut crab killing a seabird had gone viral. Prof Ng doubted that this is something the crabs do on a regular basis, going by his observations through his research on crabs since the 1990s, including trips to Christmas Island to study coconut crabs.

The Straits Times

16 November 2017 | Education, General News

Graduates from NUS are now 16th most employable in the world, according to the Global University Employability Ranking 2017 published by Times Higher Education. NUS is the only Singapore university to rank among the world’s 20 best universities for employment, and it is fourth in Asia in the global survey.

Channel NewsAsia Online, Channel 5 News, Suria News Online, and more

15 November 2017 | General News

Dr Mathew Mathews, Senior Research Fellow and Mr Leonard Lim, Research Associate, both from the Institute of Policy Studies at NUS noted that a greater proportion of respondents from a recent survey on Ethnic Identity picked a choice involving the Singaporean identity indicates that the notion of "Singaporean-ness" resonates with many of us. In contrast, comparatively fewer see themselves purely in ethnic terms. The writers also highlighted that many Singaporeans rate speaking English as a more important trait of being Singaporean than being able to trace one's ethnic heritage.

The Straits Times

15 November 2017 | General News

Prof Bryan William Van Norden, Kwan Im Thong Hood Cho Temple Professor from Yale-NUS College, wrote that commentators have been quick to observe that the recent Chinese Communist Party Congress guaranteed President Xi Jinping's firm grip on power for years to come, but however, few have noted the Confucian roots of his world view. Prof Van Norden felt that it was important to understand the Confucian roots of Mr Xi’s thought as the global situation is well suited for China’s rise.

The Straits Times, Lianhe Zaobao

15 November 2017 | General News

Assoc Prof (Practice) Simon Poh from the Dept of Accounting at NUS Business School wrote that for many years, Singapore and Hong Kong have been competing to see which city has the most competitive tax regime, attracting global companies to set up entities in their territories. He opined that although tax is not the only factor impacting a firm’s choice of location, corporate tax regimes remain an important consideration affecting companies operating or intending to operate in each of these two cities. Ultimately, businesses should perform their own due diligence and look at both the tax and non-tax considerations to arrive at an informed choice.

The Business Times

15 November 2017 | Research

The clinical research for the SG90 Longevity Study, by A*STAR and National University Health System, was led by Professor Koh Woon Puay from Duke-NUS Medical School and the Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health at NUS. The study, which began in October 2015, showed that 30 per cent of men above 90 years old had decreased cognition compared to 39 per cent in their female counterparts.

Lianhe Zaobao

14 November 2017 | Research, General News

A breakthrough discovery was made by a team of researchers led by Prof Stuart Cook, Director of the Programme in Cardiovascular & Metabolic Disorders at Duke-NUS Medical School, on a protein called interleukin 11 (IL11), which is the main protein activating and speeding up the processes of kidney and heart failure. The revelation was unprecedented, breaking down all previous misconceptions of the protein being harmless and dormant in the process of fibrosis.

The Straits Times Online, Lianhe Zaobao, TODAY, and more

14 November 2017 | General News

NUS Business School students Heng Cheng Khan Bryan, Isabella Mariska Liem, Lewis Nam Yi An and Li Wei Wang Bryan, observed that the Enterprise 50 Award winner Elixir Technology is not daunted by the odds, and has ambitious plans to be a provider of world-class solutions in the “Smart Nation” field, particularly in the domains of urban mobility, healthcare and regulatory technology (RegTech). From software engineering training and consulting to Smart Nation, Elixir has been able to transform its expertise to meet the needs of a dynamic and ever-changing economy.

The Business Times