18
March
2020
|
19:17
Europe/Amsterdam

Surprising science: Making modern science accessible

Prof Stella Tan (right) takes you to a ‘crime scene’ and shows how you can track down perpetrators with forensic science

Join NUS Chemistry Associate Professor Jason Yeo in his lab as he demonstrates how harmful greenhouse gas carbon dioxide can be converted into useful chemicals with just solar energy and water.

Enter a “crime scene” with NUS Biological Sciences Associate Professor Stella Tan , where forensic light sources and other high-tech gadgets help crime busters trace perpetrators.

Take a peek into quantum science and let NUS Physics Associate Professor Alexander Ling open the window to innovative satellite communication technology of the future.

Compute the mathematics of tsunamis with NUS Mathematics Professor Brett McInnes as he explains a process called mathematical modelling that could potentially detect tsunamis far from the shore, saving tens of thousands of lives.

Or solve mysteries of another kind and follow Assistant Professor Timothy Saunders from Computational Biology Programme, into his lab where he explains how life makes the leap from a single cell to complex organisms, using modern biology – and the help of a humble fruit fly.

We hope these short educational science clips will capture the imagination of our youths and further encourage their interest in science. We are continually looking for novel and creative ways to bring science to youths in an interesting and appealing way, as well as to bring scientific wonders to light.

These are just five of a series of 15 snappy videos put together for the first time by NUS Science. Promising to take you beyond the classroom, each video clip features scientists from the Faculty presenting and explaining a scientific concept or the application of a theory in a simple but intriguing way.

Well-regarded domain experts in their respective fields of research, some of the presenters are also award-winning educators who have received multiple university and faculty-level teaching awards.

 

 

Professor Goh Say Song, NUS Science Vice Dean (Outreach and Admissions), said the series aligns with NUS’ move towards online outreach and engagement.

“From weather forecasting to clean energy, helping to address the spread of infectious diseases and the food we eat, this specially curated series shows the relevance of science in our daily lives,” said Prof Goh.

“We hope these short educational science clips will capture the imagination of our youths and further encourage their interest in science. We are continually looking for novel and creative ways to bring science to youths in an interesting and appealing way, as well as to bring scientific wonders to light,” he added.

Surprising Science! is available on the Faculty’s on-line portal, Facebook page, Instagram account and YouTube channel.

 

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